HEMA-TIMES: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Needs Assessment Results

Research led by: 
Dr. Matthew Seftel (CancerCare Manitoba) &
Dr. James Whitlock (SickKids Hospital)

In an effort to promote a shared understanding of the range of issues, perspectives related to the use of asparaginase for adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) patients in Canada, the CARE Hematology Faculty conducted a needs assessment. The shared insights help inform where treatment considerations lie and yields visibility on challenges/information needs to update practice and introduce new therapy.

 

Current Perceptions of Biosimilars Among Canadian Gastroenterologists

Biosimilars are a reality in Canada. In an effort to promote a shared understanding of the range of issues, perspectives, and developments related to the use of biosimilars, the CARE Gastroenterology Faculty recently conducted a needs assessment.

The initiative is led by Dr. Remo Panaccione (University of Calgary).  The survey was distributed in March to Canadian gastroenterologists. There are 47 responders to date. What follows is an overview of the key takeaways from the needs assessment, along with the response data.

Key Takeaways:

  • Responders to this questionnaire are familiar with biosimilars.
  • Cost appears to be a strong factor in selecting a biosimilar. 
  • Approximately half of responding gastroenterologists indicated they would consider starting a new patient on a biosimilar over a biologic. 
  • Most responders said that they would prefer not to switch a patient who was stable on a biologic to a biosimilar. 
  • The majority of responders do not support the government “mandated switch” policy.  
    • If a switch was mandated, post marketing surveillance studies would be valuable.  
    • Among responding specialists, the steps to report an adverse event for a biosimilar are unclear.
    • It would be valuable to both identify and track which biologic(s) are being used and in what sequence.
  • Gastroenterologists want to see robust RCTs in the Canadian market; more data will improve comfort levels.

HEMA-TIMES: Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria Needs Assessment Results

Research led by Dr. Christopher Patriquin and Dr. Loree Larratt

This needs assessment was distributed by mail and electronically to upwards of 400 Canadian hematologists working in academic teaching centres and/or community practices. The response rate to this needs assessment is 19% (n=77). What follows is an overview of the key takeaways from the needs assessment, along with the response data. 

HCC Needs Assessment Results

The CARE (Community. Academic. Research. Education.) Faculty recently developed a needs assessment focused on the identification and management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), led by medical oncologist Dr. Winson Cheung (BCCA). This questionnaire was distributed to Canadian hepatologists to gain their insights on HCC. The goal was to promote a shared understanding of the range of issues, perspectives, and developments related to these issues, framed from a Canadian perspective. We ultimately want to identify at-risk patients earlier, in order to provide patients with optimal treatment. Commentary on this needs assessment was provided by leading hepatologist, Dr. Hemant Shah (Toronto Western Hospital).

Subsequent Entry Biologics Needs Assessment Results 2015

The advent of biologics has improved patient outcomes in terms of patient survival as well as drug delivery. With many of Canada’s top selling biologic molecules facing patent expiration before 2020, a greater number of more affordable subsequent entry biologics (SEBs) will compete with ‘branded’ biologics. SEBs are ‘biologics that are similar to, and enter the market subsequent to, an approved innovator biologic’. These SEBs are of interest, yet present challenges. Certain issues and questions surrounding the differences between SEBs and biologics (eg. cost, manufacturing, approval processes, etc.), need to be considered as more SEBs are developed and become available. This needs assessment focuses on some of these issues. 

Onco-Times: Melanoma Needs Assessment Results

This needs assessment was distributed by mail and electronically in December 2015 to 400 Canadian oncologists working in academic teaching centres and/or community practices. 

In order to understand both current perception and knowledge as well as gaps in knowledge on the management of melanoma with Canadian medical oncologists, a needs assessment was conducted. The research is being led by Dr. Winson Cheung (BC Cancer Agency).

GASTRO-TIMES: Subsequent Entry Biologics Needs Assessment Results

Biologics have revolutionized the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions, with significant improvements in efficacy and a manageable safety profile. In the last few years, subsequent entry biologics (SEBs) have been developed. SEBs are monoclonal antibodies that are similar but not identical to the reference biologic drug. There is no SEB approved in the gastroenterology space yet in Canada, however they are expected to enter the market in the near future. In order to understand both current perception and knowledge of SEBs with gastroenterologists, a needs assessment was conducted by the CARE Gastroenterology Faculty in the fall of 2015. The needs assessment was distributed by mail and electronically to 400 Canadian gastroenterologists working in teaching centres (49%) and/or community practices (51%). Response rate to this questionnaire was 20% (n=80). We are gratified by the high rate of participation and intent to continue this process of surveys and sharing the feedback results. Responding physicians are from the desired audience, as they all use biologics in their practice.

The current steering chair of the CARE Gastroenterology Faculty, Dr. John Marshall (McMaster University) presented the findings from this analysis at the annual CDDW 2016 meeting. What follows is an overview of results.